Making Comics

Brainstorming plot can be quite useful…

But only if you can focus on the part of the story you right now have to work at.
No brain. NO. I do not need ideas about Theo’s first marriage. It’s at least five years ahead from where we are in the story. I need a character-appropriate ways for Nyx to smash things. Not her reactions to people trying to put her into a dress, as funny as they may be.
Brain, no. BEHAVE.
Detail work like editing seems to help, at least a bit.

At this stage, all my writing’s plotting.

So, lately I have been hammering out the scene count for Nyx+Nyssa, my fantasy-horror romance (is it still horror if the main characters WIN?) and the outline is shaping up nicely. Ideally it gets done this week and I can hammer out the rough script next month during NaNoWriMo. It’s quite interesting to work on book per book basis – there’s a metric asston of story there; but I can only fit so much into the roughly 100 pages of each book. 100 pages are 25 scenes on an average of 4 pages per scene. That’s actually damn little space for a full fledged fantasy story, and I have to pick and...

On repetitive thoughts…

If I ever figure out the human brain, my first act will be to install accurate error messages. My stint with depression ended eight years ago and I still have to deal with intrusive and repetitive thoughts regularly. Maybe I am just more aware of them than I used to be, self-awareness is self-defence after all. But I know that people who lucked out in the brain department get them too: Have you ever dieted? Suddenly you think of all the things you want to eat and where to get them and how well you they’ll taste. And eventually willpower will run out and you give in. That’s a prime example of...

Budgeting Time

Last month I’ve stumbled about a series of very interesting tweets: Often drawings go wrong because the artist hasn’t thought beforehand about how much time to budget for that particular drawing. — Tips from Jesse Hamm (@Hamm_Tips) 7. Oktober 2015 Budget too much time for a drawing and you’ll grow tired and bored well before it’s completed. It may become stiff, overworked, uninspired. — Tips from Jesse Hamm (@Hamm_Tips) 7. Oktober 2015 Budget too little time for a drawing, and toward the end you may become panicked and frustrated, cutting corners and making sloppy mistakes. — Tips from Jesse...

My Projects in overview!

Since my story-brain tends to go sprawling and epic and then promptly latches onto the next SHINY!,  I’m working on getting it to focus on the bits I want it to do. Lists help!   1. Traces of Chaos: A sprawling space opera, quite epic in scope. You can read it over at trarr.net. Status:  Currently being published and valiantly limping along. It’s still alive, dammit! But it sure is taking its time. My issue is that my art keeps catching up to my writing, so I am putting in the work to get a script buffer right now. For that to work I have to untangle all the plots and the world building...

Creating characters to match your plot

Over at webcomic underdogs a fellow comicer posed the question of how to come up with characters to match the plot. It’s a good topic (give it a read) and it made me think, especially considering that my usual writing style is “find character, throw her or him at the world”. This is an intersting answer to that question: Characters are the lifeblood of a story – a story wouldn’t happen if they didn’t interact with the world. So, I think the question you need to answer is “What kind of person would choose to act like this plot requires?” For example, your plot requires a young teenage...

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